The Ides of March,March 15 & 16, 1996


American Flatbread – Flatbread Kitchen

Friday and Saturday March 15+16, 1996

Tonight’s menu and baking are dedicated to

 

The Ides of March

 

            After Julius Caesar’s victories in Gaul in 50 BC, his one time ally, Pompey, began to believe that it was Caesar’s intention to march on Rome itself. Suspicions on both sides increased, and with the aid of Cato and other enemies of Caesar, Pompey began military preparations. Unwilling to let the enemy take the initiative, Caesar ordered his troops across the Rubicon. Thus, in January, 49 BC, began the war that was to last four years, and in its wake, destroy the Republic.

            Caesar was victorious, but the war put Rome in ruins. In an effort to pick up the pieces, Caesar became dictator.

            His rule was both good and bad. The bad would bring him death. He pardoned his enemies, gave land to the poor, extended Roman citizenship north across the Po to the Alps and south to Sicily, and dealt constructively with the widespread problem of debt that both helped debtors while protecting creditors. His measures were generally moderate and restrained.

            Politically, however, Caesar was less temperate. He packed the Senate with cronies and bestowed favors to friends. Disaffected Senators and disgruntled beneficiaries hatched a conspiracy. On the Ides of March, 44 BC, the conspirators, headed by Marcus Junius Brutus and Gaius Cassius struck him down.

            The murder had been planned, its consequences were not. The struggle for power that followed Caesar’s death destroyed and chance to revitalize the Republic.

            IN ANGER WE STRIKE OUT AND DESTROY!

            WHAT IS IT THAT WE WISH TO BUILD?

                                                                                    Love,

                                                                                                George

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